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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
'm going to start with two provocative themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islam you can republic of iran." the first of these themes, and these two really get at the heart of our book. the first of these themes is that the united states is today and has been for the past few years a power in relative decline in the middle east. and the second core theme is that the biggest beneficiary of america's ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative positions of the united states and the islamic republic of iran in the middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11, just over ten years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east was either pro-american, like the governments in egypt and turkey, in negotiations effectively to become pro-american, like the governments in syria and libya, or anti-iranian like the taliban government in afghanistan and saddam hussein's government in iraq. ev
of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
by coming to the united states. >> eduardo lopez, you have remarkable footage that has never been seen before in this country throughout. in a moment, we're going to el salvador to talk about what drove a lot of the migration here. where did you get it? >> many, many sources. there's a lot of footage that has never been seen, that hasn't been seen in decades. again, this is a testament to the team that created this. our editor, catherine shields, is amazing. and so is our co-director, peter getzels. i have to say about the dominican republic, i'd like to make a point that one of the main reasons we made this film is to be personified by junot diaz, who is contributing as one of our great american writers. his whole life was changed dramatically by our invasion of the dominican republic in 1965 with 23,000 marines. something that most americans know nothing about because all of this history is never taught in our schools and colleges. so for latinos, whose life is turned upside down by our own government actions and latin america that many times we are unaware of, what happens is there
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
-- to turn the united states of america into a foreign nations for the purpose of dragnet and electronic surveillance in secret. violating the constitution. i could not stand by and be an eye witness to the subversion of our own constitution when i knew it was never necessary. the best of american ingenuity and -- ingenuity could protect the fourth amendment rights of all americans. >> that was thomas drake speaking with me earlier. sebastian, i want to start with you. the argument is the reason this was re-of the rise is that it will make the united states safer - re-authorized is that it will make the united states safer. >> i am is a prize by the negative reaction. it seems a case of the lady -- i am surprised by the negative reaction. it seems to be a case of the lady doth protest so much. people who are so adamant about civil liberties. it is not george bush in the white house and it is not republicans controlling the senate. we have an extended something that was already put in place. if you look at the cases in the past of successful al qaeda attacks in the united states, the need
in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks, will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. that's not for us to decide. it's an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no particular concern. when we're talking of numbers and how they are calculated. afghan interests. >>. >> translator: the government of afghanistan i would like to ask the question in my own language. mr. president, combative mission united states after 2014, how this mission will be, how will it be resembling, resembling the same mission as it was during 11 years? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, wha
u.s. banks offline one day, one bank after another. if the united states and israel bomb iran next year to stop the nuclear program i think we can say with high confidence that iran will retaliate. since israel or united states have attacked their homeland iran will attack in our homeland. not with terrorism but with cyber war, knocking out banking prehaps, electricity, causing havoc and getting away with it because we cannot defend successfully today against that kind of attack. [applause] >> that's a sobering thought to start a conversation with. as it happened, there were two pages in this week's "economists" that you should have on this subject on cyber war and i think it is helpful, if you can walk us through what exactly is meant by cyber war. you, yourself, mention cyber crime, cyber espionage there is a blurring of the lines. what do you mean by cyber war? >> you can rebbe using the word chuw. criber crime which is successful -- cyber crime which is successful. the cyber espionage which i think is the most serious thing today, that is the theft not 06 money but information,
in as an officer of the united states navy. i will introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. and my daughter in law on the left. my number three granddaughter, 9 number two granddaughter, nine no. 4 granddaughter -- my number two granddaughters, my no. 4 granddaughter, my oldest granddaughter who is a freshman in college now, naomi. and my third son. i told my daughter when she married, if you change your mind, i'm keeping him. [laughter] i'm very proud of them although i would be happy to claim as my this is a family affair. kids, grandkids, moms, dads. you all get it. you get what it is so important today. we still have 68,000 troops in harm's way in some of the most godforsaken territory in the world. one of the things that you all know -- they are not looking for anything. but knowing that you remember. that we back home remember, we know what is going on. this is an important piece of the equation. another important piece as they started the organization, their families, -- [indiscernible] fighting these two wars. thank god we ended one in iraq and we are ending
tunes. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> this is "gps global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria coming to you today from london. happy new year. on today's show, we'll look ahead at what 2013 might bring around the world. i have a great panel richard haass, anne-marie slaughter and ian bremer who i will ask to gaze into their crystal balls. will assad fall, will israel bomb iran, and will the euro zone finally break apart? >>> then the fiscal cliff. the view from across the pond. how did our political process look from a perch overseas and what will it all mean for the u.s. economy and the global economy? >>> also, will this be india's awakening? the nation confronts its own dark corners after a despicable deadly act. i'll look at some parallels with america's recent tragic school shooting. >>> first, here's my take. the deal to avoid the fiscal cliff is a small victory for sanity, but what it says about the future is somewhat bleak. washington will probably lurch from crisis to crisis kicking problems forward and placing band aids
and gentlemen, the journey we began together in 2001, that is afghanistan and the united states. it was for a great cause. freeing civilians from terrorism and radicalism, little bitter rating afghanistan -- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's
in the united states with their families while they work to earn green cards. as long as their relatives are u.s. citizens. the middle east tv news giant making a big move here in here e united states, al-jazeera bought current tv from former vice president al gore. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00, in with the new and out with the old. that is capitol hill hours ago, the historically unpopular 112th congress met a final time making way for the 113th congress. here is vice president biden swearing in members of the united states senate including 13 newcomers. on the other side, the house of representatives floor where new and returning members are sworn in. all eyes squarely on the embattled house speaker john boehner, the republican leader, underfire from members of his party over the troubled fiscal cliff negotiations and, too, his handling of the relief for victims of sandy. the question: would the backlash cost him the leadership job? mike, live on capitol hill. the speaker kept his job but there were defections and a lot of grum
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
to measure how effective it has been. measure it by use by the united states. there has been a significant reduction. the u.s. recognized in 2011 there was a 13% reduction. the u.n. confirms that there was a least a 12% reduction. in colombia, there were slight increases. both countries have both doubled the amount. there are other yardsticks that are better and measuring the quality of cocoa production. that is quality of life for farmers. what we found is a dynamic that has just begun to take hold. thomas has to be guarantees -- farmers have to be guaranteed. they can branch out to other things. >> is this sustainable long- term? is it enough to sustain in the long term although there may be short-term reductions. >> the forces would rip out the cocoa crops and people would have nothing to eat and people would credit leave replant. -- quicly replant. the price of coca -- it is these kinds of alternatives that give this a much better chance of being sustainable. it improves the quality of life. >> with me to further discuss bolivia going its own way in controlling its coca leaf production
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
first term as president of the united states. the president will be meeting with reporters in the east room of the white house, he's getting ready for that, originally he was scheduled for 10:15, now it's been rescheduled to 11:30. about a half hour from now. there you're seeing a live picture of the white house right now on this monday morning, once again, this will be the president's last formal news conference. in his first term as president, he's sworn in in his second term as president. the president will open his news conference later today we're told with a statement on the debt ceiling and why he has said repeatedly over these past few weeks that he will not negotiate with republicans about raising the debt ceiling, as a result he says he won't negotiate, republicans say that is a bargaining chip that they have to try to cut spending to deal with the nation's deficit. we're watching what's going on at the white house, we'll have the full coverage of the news conference leading into it. we're also watching right now what's happening in newtown, connecticut. one month to the stay
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> ladies and gentlemen, the chief justice of the united states and in court of the united states. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] jon: [patriotic music playing] [inaudible conversations] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [inaudible conversations] ladies and gentlemen, please stand as the color guard comprised of members of each of the armed forces presents our national colors. ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, the 39th president of the united states, jimmy carter and mrs. rosslyn carter. [cheering and applause] ♪ [patriotic music playing] [cheering and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ [drum roll] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [drum roll] ♪ ladies and gentlemen, the 42nd president of the united states william clinton and hillary clinton. [cheering and applause] ♪ >> hello, hey. how are you? hi. [cheering and applause] ♪ how are you? hey.
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and i thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our republic. the business of our nation goes forward. these united states are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. we suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. it distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift, and crushes the struggling young and the fixed-income elderly alike. it threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people. idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, human misery, and personal indignity. those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity. but great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. for decades we have piled deficit upon def
but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with all of the flag raisings, but this is kind of
to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, imperfect union: the eurozone in crisis. (instrumental
panel would be familiar to what we have heard today. if there were talking about the united states. they would say there is a general consensus that reform is necessary on major issues. there is no general consensus. there is grave doubt as to where the system will be able to overcome to produce in the united states important reforms that will leave this country in a reformed state as opposed to hard battles that will results reforms that are ineffective. that question is paramount. it is paramount in the united states as we look at some of the same issues. having said that, despite the vast differences between mexico and the united states, we really are quite similar. there is the feeling that something new is needed. the does not seem to be a consensus on how to get there. in general terms, i think how each of the government's in l with -- governments dea the reforms will require a great deal of care. i will explain that. i think most of the people in this room understand the relationship between mexico and the united states is generally a healthy relationship. this is not always
states, he will protect the constitution of the united states, and that is what i hope he takes very literally, and not hypocritically. i hope that he does take it literally, like i said. >> he brings up the topic of guns and gun violence. something that we will hear from the president in the weeks ahead. do you think it will be in the inaugural address? >> not explicitly. maybe some reference to making our country safer, keeping our children safe may be in their, but he will not make a pitch for gun legislation, not explicitly. >> what makes a successful second inaugural address? [laughter] >> getting to make it. [laughter] being there. it has to have a good sense of the moment. it has to be not too time bound, and it needs a sense of history as well, because only then will be read years and generations down the road. >> i agree, it has to assure the country we are on the right path, we can build on what we have done the first four years, in need to be optimistic, not fatalistic, and again, it has to have the broad themes that will be fleshed out in later policy speeches. >> te
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
as westphalian sovereignty. we the people of the united states of america. opening words of the constitution, written in philadelphia, hence philadelphia sovereignty. but what is philadelphia sovereignty, the people are sovereign, the three constitution and the core of the twin pillars of our liberty and consent. so we do have majority rule, but majority rule is limited reconstitution and the whole system of separation of powers, federalism and limited government. a lot of times people get hung up in the republic or democracy. wary compound machine, a regime that is both liberal and democratic or constitutional republic and. you can use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. zÜrich government based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution, hence the compound machine. one of the major charges raised against king george the third in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i've read that church. he, george the third has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowl
>> i ask president obama to do the right thing. the united states must renounce its which hunt against wikileaks. the united states must dissolve its fbi investigation. >> as julian assange remains holed up in the ecuadorean embassy in london, we look at a new documentary called "we steal secrets: the story of wikileaks ." today, academy award winning filmmaker alex gibney, and jennifer robinson, legal counsel to assange. >> the laws cannot protect us. >> the new documentary examines how millions have died from aids because big pharmaceutical companies and the united states refused to allow developing nations to import life-saving generic drugs. we speak with the film's director and and a doctor, peter mugyenyi, who was arrested trying to import generic drugs into the gondola. -- uganda. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has again delayed its decision on the keystone xl will pipeline, now saying it will not come before march. president obama initially sidestepped the issue in 2011 by putting it off unti
american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look forward to joining hands with you to make it as successful as possible. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> all right. and please consider me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were paved with gold and found out there were no streets and he had to do the paving, and i think the strongest part of our culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son
. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> we're across from the white house where president obama is getting ready to take the oath of office. >>> and here on the national mall, everything is in place for a huge party and all of america is invited. >>> a president who broke barriers and inspired the nation four years ago now begins a second term. a second chance to restore hope and bring change. >> despite all the hardship we've been through, despite all the frustrations of washington. i've never been more hopeful about our future. and i ask you to sustain that hope. >> the pomp, the parade, the inaugural balls will come tomorrow, but this is the day that truly mattered. when the president must raise his hand and swear to protect and defend the constitution. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >>> we're here in the heart of washington, d.c., with spectacular views of the u.s. capitol and the national mall. a two-day inaugural event is getting under way
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we v a series of feisty debates on the hot topics of the day. we start with president obama's nomination of senator chuck hagel to be the next secretary of defense. we have a clash you will want to watch. >>> then the relationship between the united states and russia keeps getting worse, whose fault is it? moscow or washington? a debate. also, the next fight in washington will be over the debt ceiling. can president obama end this craziness and bypass congress altogether? we'll talk about the out of the box solutions and whether they would work. >>> and, finally, this is the signature of the man who might be the next treasury secretary. we'll look back through history to see if there's any loopy president. speaking of secretaries of the treasury three former holders of the office and many other statesmen and women offering advice to the president on a new gps special tonight "memo to the president, road map for a second term." tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. >>> first, here's my take. chuck hagel's nomination
, here is wolf. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in washington. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to a special edition of "the situation room." for the next hour i'll take you behind the scenes to my extraordinary trip to egypt. to see if democracy is taking hold or being threatened. i had some very tough questions for egypt's new president. stand by for morning exclusive reporting. >>> i have covered the middle east for decades, but learned a lot during my trip to egypt, i saw firsthand how one of the united states's most important friends in the middle east is struggling after its revolution two years ago. i spent more than an hour talking exclusively with the egyptian president, mohamed morsi. he welcomed me to his presidential palace in cairo. and i toured the city's famous tahrir square, where the arab spring demonstrations changed the course of history. i stood in tahrir square days ago, the symbol of the revolution was largely deserted. it looked very different two years ago, during those intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian presiden
of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon all who contribute to the -- upon our armed forces, blessings upon all of contribute to the essence of the american. -- of the american spirit, the american dream,the opportunity to become whatever in mankind or womenkind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. let's act upon team meeting that everyone is included. upon the meaning that everyone is included. it may be inherent dignity and in alienable rights of every warming, a man, boy, and girl be honored. make all your people, especially -- and may all your people, especially the least of these flourished in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington we celebrate the. spiritof our ancestors. it is a nation of on bormann hopes and a history of this enfranchised folks to the union. -- to the expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our past was riddled by pangs of despair and depression, we ask for your guidance toward the light of delivery and that the vision of -- of deliverance and that
in for his second term as the 44th president of the united states. good morning. i'm gwen eiffel and welcome to his pbs news hour special coverage of today's nailingration. >> i'm jeffrey brown. it's a bright sunny day here in washington. temperatures remain in the 30's. that's a bit warmer than four years ago for the president's first inauguration. that of course saw a record-setting crowd, nearly 2 million people. no one is expecting anything quite like that this time around but still, folks have been finding spaces on the mall tonight since the sun came up. you can see them setting up spots now. we will be covering the entire inaugural ceremony live. and if you're not at your tv you can watch our live stream on our home page at news hour.pbs.org or follow us on twitter. >> this earmarks the 150th anniversary of the man'spation proclamation. you can see bill and hillary clinton on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first preside
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
a lifetime in politics, eventually becoming the vice president of the united states and now a second term this is huge. >> it's very big. yesterday exthere was a funny moment, vice president on the road was out, called himself president biden. proud to be presidented by in, he had to correct himself. i do think given recent events, takes on significance, the president brought joe biden into the middle of the talks on the fiscal cliff, helps finalize the agreement, then turned to him on gun control, there has been rumblings out there now that vice president biden might actually be interested in running in 2016. there's a whiff of politics today as justice sotomayor swears him in. it is not an accident, i think the first hispanic justice. >> suggesting part of his courting, the hispanic vote, is that what you think? >> had just possibly they had that in mind. just possibly. >> possibly 100% chance that is the case. now it is also true that sonia soto may certificate first justice appointed by the obama/biden team. when he was senator, he was chairman of the judiciary committee. supreme cour
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
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